T'boli beliefs

In response to the killing, detention, and displacement of members of their tribes, the Lumads have organized groups to gain the public's attention, calling for the halt of militarization in their communities. Students, religious leaders, and human rights advocates have supported the Lumads in their movement against the militarization. Activities held to support the Lumad movements have included concerts, cultural festivals (focusing on ethnic culture), and commemoration of Lumad leaders killed in the conflict. Activity leaders have included Fr. Fausto Tentorio, Fr. Tullio Favali, and Fr. Salvatore Carzedda. [32] Groups like the Manilakbayan 2015 supported the movements through recruitment and the handing out of national situationers to students to spread awareness about the Lumads' dilemma. [33] The Philippines' Commission on Human Rights (CHR) has been investigating the incidents in regard to the 2015 murder of Lumad leaders and a school official by a paramilitary group called Magahat/Bagani [34] (in line with the idea of CAFGU ) created by the AFP to hunt for NPA members. The AFP denies the allegation and attributes the killings to tribal conflict. [35] However, the AFP has admitted that CAFGU has Lumad recruits within its ranks while asserting that the NPA has also recruited Lumads for the group. [36] [37] There is also delay of a decision on the CHR investigation due to the noncooperation of the Lumad group after the interruption of the investigation by the spokesman of Kalumaran Mindanao, Kerlan Fanagel. Fanagel insists that the group need not have another 'false' dialogue with the CHR since CHR has yet to present the results/findings of the investigations from the past months when Lumad leaders were killed. Because of the lack of data, CHR decided to postpone the presentation of their initial report to the second week of December 2015. [38]

The architecture of the islands shows Spanish influence. Spanish brick churches built during the colonial era dominate the towns. The churches are large and different from traditional construction. It is difficult to imagine how the indigenous population in the seventeenth century was able to build them. Filipino families enjoy close kin bonds, and extended families living together are the norm. Seaports and government centers had a larger proportion of Spanish buildings with wide verandas and tiled roofs. Towns destroyed during the liberation campaign in World War II, especially in central and northern Luzon, were rebuilt using wood. Areas of Manila destroyed during World War II have been restored to their historical Spanish appearance. Newer buildings in Manila range from standard multistory offices to Western-style gated housing areas for the affluent, to tenements and shacks.

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One of the ancient customs for burying the dead in the Philippines is through the use of burial jars known as Manunggul jars . These ancient potteries were found in the Manunggul Cave on the island of Palawan . A characteristic of the jars for the dead is the presence of anthropomorphic human figures on the pot covers. These figures embody souls riding a boat for the dead while seafaring towards their sanctuary in the afterlife . These containers have been dated from 710 BC to 890 BC. There are also figures of boating people steering paddles , wearing headbands , jaw -bands, and persons with hands folded across the chest area. The latter is a method of arranging the remains of the dead. [14] [15]

T'boli beliefs

t'boli beliefs

One of the ancient customs for burying the dead in the Philippines is through the use of burial jars known as Manunggul jars . These ancient potteries were found in the Manunggul Cave on the island of Palawan . A characteristic of the jars for the dead is the presence of anthropomorphic human figures on the pot covers. These figures embody souls riding a boat for the dead while seafaring towards their sanctuary in the afterlife . These containers have been dated from 710 BC to 890 BC. There are also figures of boating people steering paddles , wearing headbands , jaw -bands, and persons with hands folded across the chest area. The latter is a method of arranging the remains of the dead. [14] [15]

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